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For those of you who have recently gotten into the game, did you build a brand (collection of a few products in the same niche) or are you just IDing individual products with good opportunity and forgetting the rest? What was the thought process behind fi

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About two weeks ago I bought Jungle Scout Pro and the Web App and I’ve been trying to find untapped keywords that I can build a brand around.

I’ve explored ~8 keyword topic areas now with good trends in Google that I have knowledge of and can create a brand around. So far, all of them are coming up hyper-competitive (average BSRs >1500 but reviews in the 150-250+ range). I’ve looked through wish lists and top selling products to see what complimentary products are being sold / gifted for ideas. The Niche Finder tool within the web app provides a lot of options (if you filter out competition), though most tend to be branded products more suited for arbitrage.

I realize this is a FAQ – but it seems like PL / FBA market is pretty saturated and the criteria for selection (BSR rank <1000 in a main category) is too stringent? Is everyone just digging deeper and deeper into sub-categories and looking at sales as the main indicator?

For those of you who have recently gotten into the game, did you build a brand (collection of a few products in the same niche) or are you just IDing individual products with good opportunity and forgetting the rest? What was the thought process behind finding keywords that didn’t have 6 pages of products?

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 I think the situation you’re articulating sounds rather common and it’s certainly a similar boat I’m in. I don’t know what you’re ambitions are with regards to first year sales. 

I eventually got to the point where I just had to pick a couple products and decide to just do something rather than suffer from paralysis from over-analysis. My personal goal is to make enough to replace my FT job while learning the ins-outs of building my own brand. I think it’s easy for any of us to just make some money off a few products.

But to build an entire brand is so much harder and yes, practically every niche will face competition. So to answer your question, I don’t think you’re gonna find a subcategory that doesn’t suffer from competition. But many new startups still find a way to penetrate their market. TL:DR; Just do it!

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 The more I think about it, the more I realize that success is more about your ability to market through multiple channels and less about the actual product. I think the future of ecommerce and FBA belongs to those who can diversify their marketing channels. Because it’s very hard to add value by relying solely on Amazon platform which is very price conscious.

And given the abundance of “FBA Gurus” and 3rd party tools like Jungle Scout, there is alot of saturation already because everyone has access to the same data now. That’s the bad news. But the good news is that I imagine it’s just alot of people picking products across multiple categories with no clear branding strategy nor enough people who are diversifying their marketing channels. So given time and effort, I think you can compete.

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No one has talked about actually selling a product that you use and know. Would it make sense in any other industry to just start a brand and start selling a product you don’t care about to just make money? How does that usually end. Rather than getting caught up in all the metrics you should look at your own life and interests to find a product you know a lot about. My revenue is six figures a month with decent margins, but I only got there by selling products I use everyday and know extremely well. Yes, it’s getting very saturated with people selling meaningless garbage from China. Don’t be one of them and you will succeed.

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You make some good points, however, verified sales numbers by YOU over an extended period of time are priceless. JS might be good enough to find a needle in a haystack, but you still have to pour through that haystack to see if there are a few or a lot of competitor’s needles! Also, out of the 2 million sellers on Amazon, I bet only 1% of that uses JS, so I wouldn’t b concerned about saturation for the foreseeable future.

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I wouldn’t worry too much about the reviews. I think they’re a bit overrated. Reviews are purely for conversion and social proof. If your product is different and in a “deep” category you should be fine because you’re not entirely competing with products with higher reviews. You’re going to have lots of competition no matter what. Even if you don’t now, you will soon if it’s a popular niche/category. That’s why customizing a product is so vital. Then you’re not just a different logo. I’m sure you know, but read hundreds or thousands of negative reviews and keep notes as you read them to pick up on themes. Then either have your manufacturer send you samples of the fixed/better products or hire a designer to design the product and produce CAD files. Hope that helps.

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